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Race & Gender Studies

TERRIBLE PERFECTION: Women and Russian Literature

TERRIBLE PERFECTION: Women and Russian Literature

By: Heldt, Barbara
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THERE ARE TWO SEXES: ESSAYS IN FEMINOLOGY

THERE ARE TWO SEXES: ESSAYS IN FEMINOLOGY

By: Fouque, Antoinette
$28.00
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Antoinette Fouque cofounded the Mouvement de Libération des Femmes (MLF) in France in 1968 and spearheaded its celebrated Psychanalyse et Politique, a research group that informed the cultural and intellectual heart of French feminism. Rather than reject Freud's discoveries on the pretext of their phallocentrism, Fouque sought to enrich his thought by more clearly defining the difference between the sexes and affirming the existence of a female libido. By recognizing women's contribution to humanity, Fouque hoped "uterus envy," which she saw as the mainspring of misogyny, could finally give way to gratitude and by associating procreation with women's liberation she advanced the goal of a parity-based society in which men and women could write a new human contract.

The essays, lectures, and dialogues in this volume finally allow English-speaking readers to access the breadth of Fouque's creativity and activism. Touching on issues in history and biography, politics and psychoanalysis, Fouque recounts her experiences running the first women's publishing house in Europe; supporting women under threat, such as Aung San Suu Kyi, Taslima Nasrin, and Nawal El Saadaoui; and serving as deputy in the European Parliament. Her theoretical explorations discuss the ongoing development of feminology, a field she initiated, and, while she celebrates the progress women have made over the past four decades, she also warns against the trends of counterliberation: the feminization of poverty, the persistence of sexual violence, and the rise of religious fundamentalism.

TO MEND THE WORLD

TO MEND THE WORLD

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As we watched the horrors wrought on September 11, 2001, unfold, the question on our lips was "Why?" A year after the attack on the United States, women of varied ethnic and religious backgrounds examine this question. Many of these writers grew up outside of the U.S. and bring a world perspective to their responses. Some are U.S.-born but have been shaped by multi-cultural experiences. Consequently, the collection creates a unique mirror that reflects the U.S. from both inside and out, revealing the clash between the economically driven force of globalization embodied by the U.S. and the stateless, transnational terrorist organization that feeds on religious fundamentalism, poverty, and hatred of the United States. It is a multi-faceted image that is created: Margaret Randall posits that "the bully stance is eminently male," and that "feminists, able to deconstruct power, have the potential for developing new grids in a battle that now assumes life and death proportions." Carol Dine speaks of firefighters, the head of Cantor Fitzgerald, and House Majority Leader Dick Armey breaking down in front of the media. "These are men rocked to their core, men no longer able to hide inside their uniforms or three-piece suits, compelled to reveal that they are vulnerable. . . . And I am forced to consider the contradictions of what it means to be male." Claudia Bernhardi states that "no political explanation, any argument ever, could or would satisfy the logic of destruction." What these writers share is the desire to open a world dialogue between cultures, between sexes, so we can prevent anything like the events of 9/11 from happening again anywhere in the world.

TOUGH ENOUGH: ARBUS, ARENDT, DIDION, MCCARTHY, SONTAG, WEIL

TOUGH ENOUGH: ARBUS, ARENDT, DIDION, MCCARTHY, SONTAG, WEIL

By: Nelson, Deborah
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This book focuses on six brilliant women who are often seen as particularly tough-minded: Simone Weil, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Diane Arbus, and Joan Didion. Aligned with no single tradition, they escape straightforward categories. Yet their work evinces an affinity of style and philosophical viewpoint that derives from a shared attitude toward suffering. What Mary McCarthy called a "cold eye" was not merely a personal aversion to displays of emotion: it was an unsentimental mode of attention that dictated both ethical positions and aesthetic approaches.

Tough Enough traces the careers of these women and their challenges to the pre-eminence of empathy as the ethical posture from which to examine pain. Their writing and art reveal an adamant belief that the hurts of the world must be treated concretely, directly, and realistically, without recourse to either melodrama or callousness. As Deborah Nelson shows, this stance offers an important counter-tradition to the familiar postwar poles of emotional expressivity on the one hand and cool irony on the other. Ultimately, in its insistence on facing reality without consolation or compensation, this austere "school of the unsentimental" offers new ways to approach suffering in both its spectacular forms and all of its ordinariness.

TURNING THE WHEEL: American Women Creating the New Buddhism

TURNING THE WHEEL: American Women Creating the New Buddhism

By: Boucher, Sandy
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American Women Creating the New Buddhism
Updated and Expanded Edition
"Essential reading for anyone wanting to understand feminism, Buddhist practice in America today, and where and how these two movements meet."
-Susan Griffin, author of Woman and Nature
U.S. HISTORY AS WOMEN'S HISTORY

U.S. HISTORY AS WOMEN'S HISTORY

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This outstanding collection of fifteen original essays represents innovative work by some of the most influential scholars in the field of women's history. Covering a broad sweep of history from the American Revolution to contemporary times and ranging over the fields of legal, social, political, and cultural history, this book, according to its editors, "intrudes into regions of the American historical narrative from which women have been excluded or in which gender relations were not thought to play a part." State formation, power, and knowledge have not traditionally been understood as the subjects of women's history, but they are the themes that permeate this book. Individually and together, the essays explore how gender serves to legitimize particular constructions of power and knowledge and to meld these into accepted practice and state policy. They show how the study of women's history has moved from the discovery of women to an evaluation of social processes and institutions.
UNBECOMING WOMEN: British Women Writers and the Novel of Development

UNBECOMING WOMEN: British Women Writers and the Novel of Development

By: Fraiman, Susan
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Is there a "female Bildungsroman"? Can the story of Elizabeth Bennet's development be yoked to a genre conceived in terms of Wilhelm Meister and David Copperfield? Unbecoming Women unpacks the ideological baggage of the Bildungsroman, and turns to novels of development and conduct books by women for a new poetics of growing up.

In a subtle reading of works by Frances Burney, Jane Austen, Charlotte Bronte, and George Eliot, Susan Fraiman argues that a heroine's progress toward masterful selfhood is by no means assured. Focusing on "counternarratives" in which girls do not enter the world so much as flounder on its doorstep, Fraiman suggests that becoming a woman involves de-formation, disorientation, and the loss of authority.

By stressing the rival stories in a single text, Unbecoming Women provides a fresh assessment of the Bildungsroman. Instead of the usual question--"How does the hero of this novel come of age?"--Fraiman asks, "What are the divergent developmental narratives at work, and what can they tell us about competing ideologies concerning the feminine?"

Written with grace and theoretical mastery, Unbecoming Women emphasizes the subversive as well as dialectical aspects of a genre long considered homogeneous. The result is a compelling work of literary criticism that, charting female destiny in Georgian and Victorian texts, also postmodernizes the novel of development.

VAGINA MONOLOGUES

VAGINA MONOLOGUES

By: Ensler, Eve
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A landmark in women's empowerment--as relevant as ever in the age of #MeToo--that honors female sexuality in all its complexity

It's been more than twenty years since Eve Ensler's international sensation The Vagina Monologues gave birth to V-Day, the radical, global grassroots movement to end violence against women and girls. This special edition features six never-before-published monologues, a new foreword by National Book Award winner Jacqueline Woodson, a new introduction by the author, and a new afterword by One Billion Rising director Monique Wilson on the stage phenomenon's global impact. Witty and irreverent, compassionate and wise, this award-winning masterpiece gives voice to real women's deepest fantasies, fears, anger, and pleasure, and calls for a world where all women are safe, equal, free, and alive in their bodies.

Praise for The Vagina Monologues

"Probably the most important piece of political theater of the last decade."--The New York Times

"This play changed the world. Seeing it changed my soul. Performing in it changed my life. I am forever indebted to Eve Ensler and the transformative legacy of this play."--Kerry Washington

"Spellbinding, funny, and almost unbearably moving . . . both a work of art and an incisive piece of cultural history, a poem and a polemic, a performance and a balm and a benediction."--Variety

"Often wrenching, frequently riotous. . . . Ensler is an impassioned wit."--Los Angeles Times

"Extraordinary . . . a compelling rhapsody of the female essence."--Chicago Tribune

VISIBLY FEMALE: Feminism and Art Today

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VOICING TODAY'S VISIONS: Writings by Contemporary Women Artists

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A compelling anthology in which 14 contemporary women artists articulate with great imaginative power the personal and aesthetic issues that shape their lives and works. Each artist is introduced by a representative work of art and brief biographical sketch that examines her place in the history of
WARRIOR MARKS: Female Genital Mutilation & the Sexual Blinding of Women

WARRIOR MARKS: Female Genital Mutilation & the Sexual Blinding of Women

By: Parmar, Pratibha
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In her best-selling 1992 novel, Possessing the Secret of Joy, Alice Walker opened a painful door: she brought the issue of female genital mutilation, a practice that affects one hundred million of the world's women, to the attention of the reading public. For many readers, this first encounter with a subject previously unfamiliar to them was shocking and unforgettable. Alice Walker decided early in the process of writing her novel that she had not yet done enough to help stop this age-old practice. She resolved to make a documentary film that would further educate people about the harmful, sometimes deadly process of removing the clitoris - and often the remaining outer genitalia - as a means of maintaining tradition and ensuring a woman's "cleanliness" and fidelity. To make the film, Alice Walker teamed up with Indian-British filmmaker Pratibha Parmar, whose credits include several widely acclaimed documentaries focusing on issues of race, gender, and sexuality. This book chronicles their odyssey together. Warrior Marks describes a unique filmmaking journey, from Alice Walker's first letter to Pratibha Parmar proposing the idea of the film to the many journal entries and observations each of them made along the way. From California to England to Senegal, The Gambia, and Burkina Faso, Warrior Marks follows Walker and Parmar as they interview people who are concerned with and affected by the practice of female genital mutilation. The text includes transcripts of their interviews, three new poems by Alice Walker, and over fifty photographs offering a vivid and poignant portrayal of the people and places they visited. For its insights into the collaborative creative process, as well as itsperceptions about the politics of filmmaking and the politics of feminism, Warrior Marks is an extraordinary volume. It is also the adventure of two remarkable women who together fulfilled a dream.
WHEN ANGELS SPEAK OF LOVE

WHEN ANGELS SPEAK OF LOVE

By: Hooks, Bell
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Icon of women's movement and author of over twenty books, including a narrative series on love, bell hooks reminds us of the good and bad moments we spend in love through her inspiring poetry.When Angels Speak of Love is a book of 50 love poems by the icon of the feminist movement and most famous among public intellectuals. In beautiful, profoundly poetic terms, hooks challenges our views and experiences with love--tracing the link between seduction and surrender, the intensity of desire, and the anguish of death. Whether towards family, friends, or oneself, hooks's creative genius makes love both magical and beautiful. Her poems are written from the heart and learned by the reader's heart.

WHERE THE MEANINGS ARE

By: Stimpson, Catharine R
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WHETHER A CHRISTIAN WOMAN SHOULD BE EDUCATED & OHER WRITINGS

WHETHER A CHRISTIAN WOMAN SHOULD BE EDUCATED & OHER WRITINGS

By: Van Schurman, Anna Maria
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Advocate and exemplar of women's education, female of aristocratic birth and modest demeanor, Anna Maria van Schurman (1607-1678) was one of Reformation Europe's most renowned writers defending women's intelligence. From her early teens, Schurman garnered recognition and admiration for her accomplishments in languages, philosophy, poetry, and painting. As an adult she actively engaged in written correspondence and debate with Europe's leading intellectuals. Nevertheless, Schurman refused to regard herself as an anomaly among women. A supporter of the female sex, she argues that the same rigorous education that shaped her should be made available to all Christian daughters of the aristocracy.

Gathered here in meticulous translation are Anna Maria van Schurman's defense of women's education, her letters to other learned women, and her own account of her early life, as well as responses to her work from male contemporaries, and rare writings by Schurman's mentor, Voetius. This volume will interest the general reader as well as students of women's, religious, and social history.

WHO'S BLACK AND WHY?

WHO'S BLACK AND WHY?

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"A fascinating, if disturbing, window onto the origins of racism."
--Publishers Weekly

"The eighteenth-century essays published for the first time in Who's Black and Why? contain a world of ideas--theories, inventions, and fantasies--about what blackness is, and what it means. To read them is to witness European intellectuals, in the age of the Atlantic slave trade, struggling, one after another, to justify atrocity."
--Jill Lepore, author of These Truths: A History of the United States

The first translation and publication of sixteen submissions to the notorious eighteenth-century Bordeaux essay contest on the cause of black skin--an indispensable chronicle of the rise of scientifically based, anti-Black racism.

In 1739 Bordeaux's Royal Academy of Sciences announced a contest for the best essay on the sources of "blackness." What is the physical cause of blackness and African hair, and what is the cause of Black degeneration, the contest announcement asked. Sixteen essays, written in French and Latin, were ultimately dispatched from all over Europe. The authors ranged from naturalists to physicians, theologians to amateur savants. Documented on each page are European ideas about who is Black and why.

Looming behind these essays is the fact that some four million Africans had been kidnapped and shipped across the Atlantic by the time the contest was announced. The essays themselves represent a broad range of opinions. Some affirm that Africans had fallen from God's grace; others that blackness had resulted from a brutal climate; still others emphasized the anatomical specificity of Africans. All the submissions nonetheless circulate around a common theme: the search for a scientific understanding of the new concept of race. More important, they provide an indispensable record of the Enlightenment-era thinking that normalized the sale and enslavement of Black human beings.

These never previously published documents survived the centuries tucked away in Bordeaux's municipal library. Translated into English and accompanied by a detailed introduction and headnotes written by Henry Louis Gates, Jr., and Andrew Curran, each essay included in this volume lays bare the origins of anti-Black racism and colorism in the West.

WHY I AM NOT A FEMINIST: A FEMINIST MANIFESTO

WHY I AM NOT A FEMINIST: A FEMINIST MANIFESTO

By: Crispin, Jessa
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Outspoken critic Jessa Crispin delivers a searing rejection of contemporary feminism . . . and a bracing manifesto for revolution.

Are you a feminist? Do you believe women are human beings and that they deserve to be treated as such? That women deserve all the same rights and liberties bestowed upon men? If so, then you are a feminist . . . or so the feminists keep insisting. But somewhere along the way, the movement for female liberation sacrificed meaning for acceptance, and left us with a banal, polite, ineffectual pose that barely challenges the status quo. In this bracing, fiercely intelligent manifesto, Jessa Crispin demands more.

Why I Am Not A Feminist is a radical, fearless call for revolution. It accuses the feminist movement of obliviousness, irrelevance, and cowardice--and demands nothing less than the total dismantling of a system of oppression.


Praise for Jessa Crispin, and The Dead Ladies Project

"I'd follow Jessa Crispin to the ends of the earth." --Kathryn Davis, author of Duplex

"Read with caution . . . Crispin is funny, sexy, self-lacerating, and politically attuned, with unique slants on literary criticism, travel writing, and female journeys. No one crosses genres, borders, and proprieties with more panache." --Laura Kipnis, author of Men: Notes from an Ongoing Investigation

"Very, very funny. . . . The whole book is packed with delightfully offbeat prose . . . as raw as it is sophisticated, as quirky as it is intense." --The Chicago Tribune

WICKEDARY

By: Daly, Mary
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A bold and rollicking new dictionary spinning off from the work of radical feminism's most creative wordweaver, identified as the first and still the most challenging of contemporary philosophers.--Robin Morgan, Ms. Magazine. 30 illustrations.
WOMAN IN CRESTED KIMONO: The Life opF Shibue Io

WOMAN IN CRESTED KIMONO: The Life opF Shibue Io

By: McClellan, Edwin
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"The life of Shibue Io and her family, a kind of Japanese Buddenbrooks, may be unknown in the West, but her rich and engaging story marks the intersection of a remarkable woman with a fascinating time in history."-Arthur Golden, author of Memoirs of a Geisha "It stands clichÈs about traditional Japan on their heads. . . .Together with the people she knew, Io lives on in this literary album of old family pictures. It is well worth looking at."-Ian Buruma, New York Times Book Review "A most engaging book. Seeing Shibue Io through the various lenses of her husband, her son, Tamotsu (from whom much information is gleaned), the novelist Ogai, and the biographer McClellan is an interesting, moving, disarming experience."-Donald Richie, Japan Times "McClellan. . . has created a lively world, populated by women of various classes, samurai, doctors, poets, merchants, juvenile delinquents, and old eccentrics. The various incidents in which these people become involved provide a vivid picture of late Tokugawa society. This is a remarkable accomplishment."-Nakai Yoshiyuki, Monumenta Nipponica "An engrossing, informative, and extremely useful book. . . . Woman in the Crested Kimono is not simply the account of one unusual Tokugawa woman. It is an evocation of a family, and through a family the entire samurai class, going from the comparative affluence of the late Tokugawa period through the turmoils of the restoration and beyond."-Susan Napier, Journal of Asian Studies Daughter of a merchant family in nineteenth-century Japan and wife of a distinguished scholar-doctor of the samurai class, Shibue Io was a woman remarkable in her own right for her exceptionally keen mind and fearless spirit. Edwin McClellan now draws on the biography of her husband, written by Mori Ogai, to tell the story of Shibue Io, her society, and her times.
WOMAN PISSING

WOMAN PISSING

By: Cooperman, Elizabeth
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When we think of prototypical artists, we think of, say, Picasso, who made work quickly, easily, effervescently. On the contrary, in Woman Pissing, a literary collage that takes its title from a raunchy Picasso painting, Elizabeth Cooperman celebrates artists--particularly twentieth-century women artists--who have struggled with debilitating self-doubt and uncertainty. At the same time, Cooperman grapples with her own questions of creativity, womanhood, and motherhood, considering her decade-long struggle to finish writing her own book and realizing that she has failed to perform one of the most fundamental creative acts--bearing a child.

Woman Pissing is composed of roughly one hundred short prose "paintings" that converge around questions of creativity and fecundity. As the book unfolds it builds a larger metaphor about creativity, and the concerns of artistry and motherhood begin to entwine. The author comes to terms with self-doubt, inefficiency, frustration, and a nonlinear, circuitous process and proposes that these methods might be antidotes to the aggressive bravura and Picassian overconfidence of ego-driven art.

WOMANGUIDES: Readings Toward a Feminist Theology

WOMANGUIDES: Readings Toward a Feminist Theology

By: Ruether, Rosemary Radford
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WOMEN AGAINST THE IRON FIST

By: Oldfield, Sybil
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WOMEN IN MOVEMENT

WOMEN IN MOVEMENT

By: Rowbotham, Sheila
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Women in Movement is an historical introduction to a wide range of women's movements from the late-18th century to the present. It describes economic, social and political ideas that have inspired women to organize, not only in Europe and North America, but also in the Third World.
WOMEN IN THE CIVIL WAR

WOMEN IN THE CIVIL WAR

By: Massey, Mary Elizabeth
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The Civil War wrought cataclysmic changes in the lives of American Women on both sides of the conflict. Women in the Civil War demonstrates their enterprise, fortitude, and fierceness. In this revealing social history, Massey focuses on many famous women, including nurses Dorothea Dix, Clara Barton, and Mother Bickerdyke; spies Pauline Cushman and Belle Boyd; writers Louisa May Alcott, Julia Ward Howe, and Mary Chestnut; pamphleteer and military strategist Anna Ella Carroll; black abolitionists Harriet Tubman and Sojourner Truth; feminists Susan B. Anthony and Jane Grey Swisshelm; and political wives Varina Davis and Mary Todd Lincoln. The anonymous women who maintained farms and plantations are described, as are camp followers, businesswomen, entertainers, activists, and socialites in Charleston and Washington.
WOMEN'S SECRETS (DE SECRETIS MULIENIM)

WOMEN'S SECRETS (DE SECRETIS MULIENIM)

By: Lemay, Helen Rodnite
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Women's Secrets provides the first modern translation of the notorious treatise De secretis mulierum, popular throughout the late middle ages and into modern times. The Secrets deals with human reproduction and was written to instruct celibate medieval monks on the facts of life and some of the ways of the universe. However, the book had a much more far-reaching influence. Lemay shows how its message that women were evil, lascivious creatures built on the misogyny of the work's Aristotelian sources and laid the groundwork for serious persecution of women.

Both the content of the treatise and the reputation of its author (erroneously believed to be Albertus Magnus) inspired a few medieval scholars to compose lengthy commentaries on the text, substantial selections from which are included, providing further evidence of how medieval men interpreted science and viewed the female body.

WOMEN, RESISTANCE AND REVOLUTION: A HISTORY OF WOMEN AND REVOLUTION IN THE MODERN WORLD

WOMEN, RESISTANCE AND REVOLUTION: A HISTORY OF WOMEN AND REVOLUTION IN THE MODERN WORLD

By: Rowbotham, Sheila
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This classic book provides a historical overview of feminist strands among the modern revolutionary movements of Russia, China and the Third World. Sheila Rowbotham shows how women rose against the dual challenges of an unjust state system and social-sexual prejudice. Women, Resistance and Revolution is an invaluable historical study, as well as a trove of anecdote and example fit to inspire today's generation of feminist thinkers and activists.
WONDROUS TRANSFORMATIONS

WONDROUS TRANSFORMATIONS

By: Li, Alison
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Harry Benjamin (1885-1986), a German-born endocrinologist, was a pivotal figure in the development of transgender medicine. He was physician to transgender pioneers such as Christine Jorgensen, the 1950s "Ex-GI" turned "Blonde Beauty" media sensation, and in turn, she and other collaborators helped to shape Benjamin's influential 1966 book, The Transsexual Phenomenon. Alison Li's much-needed biography of Benjamin chronicles his passion for hormones and his lifelong interest in sexology.

Drawing from extensive research in archival documents, secondary sources, and interviews, Li tells the story of Benjamin's early ventures in gerontology and his later work with over a thousand transgender patients. Benjamin's contributions to treatment, education, research, and networking helped to create the institutional foundations of transgender medicine. Moreover, they set the stage for a radical reconsideration of gender identity, challenging us to reflect upon what it is to be male or female and to envision moving beyond these long-held categories.



WORLD WITHOUT WOMEN: Christian Clerical Culture of Western Science

WORLD WITHOUT WOMEN: Christian Clerical Culture of Western Science

By: Noble, David F
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Why is it that Western science evolved as a thoroughly male-dominated enterprise? As philosopher Sandra Harding has noted, "women have been more systematically excluded from doing serious science than performing any other social activity except, perhaps, frontline warfare." In A World Without Women, David F. Noble provides the first full-scale investigation of the origins and implications of the masculine culture of Western science and technology, and in the process offers some surprising revelations.
Noble begins by showing that, contrary to the widely held notion that the culture of learning in the West has always excluded women--an assumption that rests largely upon the supposed legacy of ancient Greece--men did not thoroughly dominate intellectual life until the beginning of the second millennium of the Christian era. At this time science and the practices of higher learning became the exclusive province of the newly celibate Christian clergy, whose ascetic culture denied women a place in any scholarly enterprise. By the twelfth century, papal reform movements had all but swept away the material and ideological supports of future female participation in the world of learning; as never before, women were on the outside looking in. Noble further demonstrates that the clerical legacy of a world without women remained more or less intact through the Reformation, and permeated the emergant culture of science.
A World Without Women finally points to a dread of women at the core of modern scientific and technological enterprise, as these disciplines work to deprive one-half of humanity of its role in production (as seen in the Industrial Revolution's male appropriation of labor) and reproduction as well (the age-old quest for an artificial womb). It also makes plain the hypocrisy of a community that can honor a female scientist with a bronze bust, as England's Royal Society did for Mary Somerville in the mid-nineteenth century, yet deny her entry to the very meeting hall in which it enjoyed pride of place.
An important and often disturbing book, A World Without Women is essential reading for anyone concerned not only about the world of science, but about the world that science has made.
WORTH OF WOMEN

WORTH OF WOMEN

By: Fonte, Moderata
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Gender equality and the responsibility of husbands and fathers: issues that loom large today had currency in Renaissance Venice as well, as evidenced by the publication in 1600 of "The Worth of Women" by Moderata Fonte.

Moderata Fonte was the pseudonym of Modesta Pozzo (1555-92), a Venetian woman who was something of an anomaly. Neither cloistered in a convent nor as liberated from prevailing codes of decorum as a courtesan might be, Pozzo was a respectable, married mother who produced literature in genres that were commonly considered "masculine"--the chivalric romance and the literary dialogue. This work takes the form of the latter, with Fonte creating a conversation among seven Venetian noblewomen. The dialogue explores nearly every aspect of women's experience in both theoretical and practical terms. These women, who differ in age and experience, take as their broad theme men's curious hostility toward women and possible cures for it.

Through this witty and ambitious work, Fonte seeks to elevate women's status to that of men, arguing that women have the same innate abilities as men and, when similarly educated, prove their equals. Through this dialogue, Fonte provides a picture of the private and public lives of Renaissance women, ruminating on their roles in the home, in society, and in the arts.

A fine example of Renaissance vernacular literature, this book is also a testament to the enduring issues that women face, including the attempt to reconcile femininity with ambition.

WOUNDS OF PASSION

WOUNDS OF PASSION

By: Hooks, Bell
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"bell hooks's brave memoir of struggling to find her own work, love, and independence." --Gloria Steinem
With her customary boldness and insight, brilliant social critic and public intellectual bell hooks traces her writer's journey in Wounds of Passion. She shares the difficulties and triumphs, the pleasures and the dangers, of a life devoted to writing. hooks lets readers see the ways one woman writer can find her own voice while forging relationships of love in keeping with her feminist thinking. With unflinching courage and hard-won wisdom, hooks reveals the intimate details and provocative ideas of the life path she carved out of words, lighting the way for all writers who would tread in her wake.
This memoir is an illuminating vision of a writer's life from one of America's treasured authors.
"I love this book. Each offering from bell hooks is a major event, as she has so much to give us." --Maya Angelou

WRITING WOMEN IN JACOBEAN ENGLAND

WRITING WOMEN IN JACOBEAN ENGLAND

By: Lewalski, Barbara Kiefer
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When was feminism born--in the 1960s, or in the 1660s? For England, one might answer: the early decades of the seventeenth century. James I was King of England, and women were expected to be chaste, obedient, subordinate, and silent. Some, however, were not, and these are the women who interest Barbara Lewalski--those who, as queens and petitioners, patrons and historians, and poets took up the pen to challenge and subvert the repressive patriarchal ideology of Jacobean England.

Setting out to show how these women wrote themselves into their culture, Lewalski rewrites Renaissance history to include some of its most compelling--and neglected--voices. In these women, Lewalski identifies an early challenge to the dominant culture--and an ongoing challenge to our understanding of the Renaissance world.