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Nature

MEN AND GODS IN MONGOLIA

MEN AND GODS IN MONGOLIA

By: Haslund, Henning
$18.95
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First published in 1935 by Kegan Paul of London, this rare and unusual book takes us into the virtually unknown world of Mongolia, a country historically cloaked in secrecy which has only recently opened up to the west.

Haslund takes us to the lost city of Karakota in the Gobi desert and meets the Bodgo Gegen, a god-king Mongolia similar to the Dalai Lama of Tibet;
Dambin Jansang, the dreaded warlord of the Black Gobi. Most incredibly, he writes about the Hi-mori, an "airhorse" that flies through the sky and carries with it the sacred stone of Chintamani. And there is plenty of just plain adventure: camel caravans; initiation into Shamanic societies; reincarnated warlords; and the violent birth of modern Mongolia. This rare and exciting book is now back in print!
MIRACLE IN THE ANDES

MIRACLE IN THE ANDES

By: Rause, Vince
$13.95
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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER - A harrowing, moving first-person account of the 1972 plane crash that left its survivors stranded on a glacier in the Andes--and one man's quest to lead them all home--by Nando Parrado, a subject of the Oscar-nominated film Society of the Snow

Featuring a new introduction by the author to commemorate of the fiftieth anniversary of the crash

"In straightforward, staggeringly honest prose, Nando Parrado tells us what it took--and what it actually felt like--to survive high in the Andes for seventy-two days after having been given up for dead."--Jon Krakauer, author of Into the Wild

"In the first hours there was nothing, no fear or sadness, just a black and perfect silence."

Nando Parrado was unconscious for three days before he woke to discover that the plane carrying his rugby team to Chile had crashed deep in the Andes, killing many of his teammates, his mother, and his sister. Stranded with the few remaining survivors on a lifeless glacier and thinking constantly of his father's grief, Parrado resolved that he could not simply wait to die. So Parrado, an ordinary young man with no particular disposition for leadership or heroism, led an expedition up the treacherous slopes of a snowcapped mountain and across forty-five miles of frozen wilderness in an attempt to save his friends' lives as well as his own.

Decades after the disaster, Parrado tells his story with remarkable candor and depth of feeling. Miracle in the Andes, a first-person account of the crash and its aftermath, is more than a riveting tale of true-life adventure; it is a revealing look at life at the edge of death and a meditation on the limitless redemptive power of love.

MOTH SNOWSTORM: NATURE AND JOY

MOTH SNOWSTORM: NATURE AND JOY

By: McCarthy, Michael
$18.95
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The moth snowstorm, a phenomenon Michael McCarthy remembers from his boyhood when moths "would pack a car's headlight beams like snowflakes in a blizzard," is a distant memory. Wildlife is being lost, not only in the wholesale extinctions of species but also in the dwindling of those species that still exist.

The Moth Snowstorm is unlike any other book about climate change today; combining the personal with the polemical, it is a manifesto rooted in experience, a poignant memoir of the author's first love: nature. McCarthy traces his adoration of the natural world to when he was seven, when the discovery of butterflies and birds brought sudden joy to a boy whose mother had just been hospitalized and whose family life was deteriorating. He goes on to record in painful detail the rapid dissolution of nature's abundance in the intervening decades, and he proposes a radical solution to our current problem: that we each recognize in ourselves the capacity to love the natural world.

Arguing that neither sustainable development nor ecosystem services have provided adequate defense against pollution, habitat destruction, species degradation, and climate change, McCarthy asks us to consider nature as an intrinsic good and an emotional and spiritual resource, capable of inspiring joy, wonder, and even love. An award-winning environmental journalist, McCarthy presents a clear, well-documented picture of what he calls "the great thinning" around the world, while interweaving the story of his own early discovery of the wilderness and a childhood saved by nature. Drawing on the truths of poets, the studies of scientists, and the author's long experience in the field, The Moth Snowstorm is part elegy, part ode, and part argument, resulting in a passionate call to action.

MOUNTAIN BIKERS TRAINING BIBLE

MOUNTAIN BIKERS TRAINING BIBLE

By: Friel, Joe
$19.95
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Mountain biking presents unique challenges, and noted expert Joe Friel addresses them all in his latest book. Covering every aspect of training, he helps riders maximize their experience and minimize problems.
MOUNTAIN WORLD

MOUNTAIN WORLD

$16.95
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An anthology of mountain-inspired literature. It features folktales, myths, essays, travelogues, and poetry of both ancient and modern times. It features the mountain experiences that range from the altitude-induced vision of Simon Bolivar atop Mount Chimborazo, to a Victorian-era pleasure trip in the Alps.
MOUNTAINS OF CALIFORNIA

MOUNTAINS OF CALIFORNIA

By: Muir, John
$16.95
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A great hero of America's conservation movement, John Muir (1838-1914) was active in establishing the Yosemite Valley as a protected national park and in awakening interest in the importance of safeguarding natural resources. In this tribute to the grandeur of the Sierras, Muir recounts his journeys by foot through the Yosemite Valley, Mount Whitney, the famed sequoia forests, King's Canyon, and other wilderness areas.
With a natural historian's keen eye for flora, geography, and geology, Muir describes glaciers, lakes, trees, and the daily lives of the region's inhabitants. His lyrical narrative, imbued with the deepest understanding and respect for nature, examines the ways in which natural forces shape the landscape and the effects of the changing seasons. The zesty travelogue is accompanied by splendid illustrations of maps, plants, and animals. Originally published in 1894, The Mountains of California continues to delight and inform readers.
MURMURATION OF STARLINGS: THE COLLECTIVE NOUNS OF ANIMALS AND BIRDS

MURMURATION OF STARLINGS: THE COLLECTIVE NOUNS OF ANIMALS AND BIRDS

By: Palin, Steve
$11.95
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A flock of birds, even a skein of geese perhaps -- but a cete of badgers, or a grist of bees?

The collective nouns of animals and birds have long inspired and intrigued us. Many have their roots in medieval times, in particular applied to those creatures hunted by man, and subject to the etiquette of their proper group names.

Author Steve Palin has beautifully illustrated and given the background to about fifty different animals and birds with interesting collective nouns -- and listed 420 of them in his glossary.

This elegant little book will appeal to all those with a fascination for the English language, those who want the answers for quizzes and crossword puzzles, and those with an interest in animals and birds.
MY FIRST SUMMER IN THE SIERRA

MY FIRST SUMMER IN THE SIERRA

By: Muir, John
$14.00
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In the summer of 1869, John Muir made his first long trip to Yosemite. When a friend offered him the chance to accompany his flock of sheep and a shepherd to the high pastures of the Sierra, it was an opportunity Muir could not resist. My First Summer in the Sierra is the journal he kept of those summer days, of the wildlife and plant life, and of his explorations into the magical places of the mountains.
MY FIRST SUMMER IN THE SIERRA

MY FIRST SUMMER IN THE SIERRA

By: Muir, John
$16.99
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John Muir's beloved adventure in the Sierra reissued to entertain, encourage, and inspire contemporary naturalists.

Considered one of the patron saints of twentieth-century environmental activity, John Muir's appeal to modern readers is that he not only explored the American West but also fought for its preservation. My First Summer in the Sierra is Muir's account of his adventures and observations while working as a shepherd in the Yosemite Valley, which later became Yosemite National Park as a direct result of Muir's writings and activism. Muir's heartfelt and often humorous descriptions of his first summer spent in the Sierra will captivate and inspire long-time fans and novice naturalists alike.

NATURAL ACTS: Sidelong View of Science & Nature

NATURAL ACTS: Sidelong View of Science & Nature

By: Quammen, David
$16.95
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"Lively writing about science and nature depends less on the offering of good answers, I think, than on the offering of good questions," said David Quammen in the original introduction to Natural Acts. For more than two decades, he has stuck to that credo. In this updated version of curiosity leads him from New Mexico to Romania, from the Congo to the Amazon, asking questions about mosquitoes (what are their redeeming merits?), dinosaurs (how did they change the life of a dyslexic Vietnam vet?), and cloning (can it save endangered species?).

This revised and expanded edition best-loved "Natural Acts" columns, which first appeared in Outside magazine in the early 1980s, and includes recent pieces such as "Planet of Weeds," an influential new Natural Acts is an eye-opening journey that will please both Quammen fans and newcomers to his work.

NATURAL HISTORY OF THE SENSES

NATURAL HISTORY OF THE SENSES

By: Ackerman, Diane
$15.95
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Diane Ackerman's lusciously written grand tour of the realm of the senses includes conversations with an iceberg in Antarctica and a professional nose in New York, along with dissertations on kisses and tattoos, sadistic cuisine and the music played by the planet Earth.

"Delightful . . . gives the reader the richest possible feeling of the worlds the senses take in." --The New York Times

NATURE AS MEASURE:Selected Essays

NATURE AS MEASURE:Selected Essays

By: Jackson, Wes
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An essential and timely collection of wise and compelling essays from one of the longtime leaders of the sustainable agriculture movement in America.

Wes Jackson, "a well-known and admired advocate for sustainability especially as it relates to agriculture, has the rare ability to transform his convictions into captivating prose . . . Jackson's thoughts are still as significant and profound as they were nearly 20 years ago" (Publishers Weekly) and can teach us many things about the land, soil, and conservation, but what most resonates is this: The ecosphere is self-regulating, and as often as we attempt to understand it, we are not its builders, and our manuals will often be faulty. The only responsible way to learn the nuances of the land is to study the soil and vegetation in their natural state and pass this knowledge on to future generations.

"[A] small book rich in ideas" (The New York Times Book Review), Nature as Measure collects Jackson's essays from Altars of Unhewn Stone and Becoming Native to This Place, presenting ideas of land conservation and education that are written from the point of view of a man who has practiced what he's preached and proven that it is possible to partially restore much of the land that we've ravaged. Wes Jackson lays the foundation for a new farming economy, grounded in nature's principles and located in dying small towns and rural communities. Exploding the tenets of industrial agriculture, Jackson seeks to integrate food production with nature in a way that sustains both. His longtime friend Wendell Berry provides an informative, contextual Introduction.

"For those concerned about what will be left and how many billion will be starving in twenty years, this is a must read." --Register of the Kentucky Historical Society

"A good introduction to a thinker whose ideas on agriculture are radical both in their technical approach to food production as well as in terms of the economic, social, and cultural context within which it is practiced." --Review of Radical Political Economics

NATURE OF HOME

NATURE OF HOME

By: Gaard, Greta
$17.95
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"As long as humans have been around, we've had to move in order to survive." So arises that most universal and elemental human longing for home, and so begins Greta Gaard's exploration of just precisely what it means to be at home in the world.

Gaard journeys through the deserts of southern California, through the High Sierras, the Wind River Mountains, and the Northern Cascades, through the wildlands and waterways of Washington and Minnesota, through snow season, rain season, mud season, and lilac season, yet her essays transcend mere description of natural beauty to investigate the interplay between place and identity. Gaard examines the earliest environments of childhood and the relocations of adulthood, expanding the feminist insight that identity is formed through relationships to include relationships to place. "Home" becomes not a static noun, but an active verb: the process of cultivating the connections with place and people that shape who we become.

Striving to create a sense of home, Gaard involves herself socially, culturally, and ecologically within her communities, discovering that as she works to change her environment, her environment changes her. As Gaard investigates environmental concerns such as water quality, oil spills, or logging, she touches on their parallels to community issues such as racism, classism, and sexism, uncovering the dynamic interaction by which "humans, like other life on earth, both shape and are shaped by our environments."

While maintaining an understanding of the complex systems and structures that govern communities and environments, Gaard's writing delves deeper to reveal the experiences and realities we displace through euphemisms or stereotypes, presenting issues such as homelessness or hunger with compelling honesty and sensitivity. Gaard's essays form a quest narrative, expressing the process of letting go that is an inherent part of an impermanent life. And when a person is broken, in the aftermath of that letting go, it is a place that holds the pieces together.

As long as we are forced to move--by economics, by war, by colonialism--the strategies we possess to make and redefine home are imperative to our survival, and vital in the shaping of our very identities.

NATURE ON THE DOORSTEP

NATURE ON THE DOORSTEP

By: Douglas, Angela E
$19.95
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Nature on the Doorstep reveals the simple pleasures of paying attention to the natural world in one's own backyard over the course of a year. In weekly letters, Angela Douglas shares the joys and curiosities of a decidedly ordinary patch of green in upstate New York cultivated through the art of "strategic neglect"--sometimes taking a hand to manage wildlife, more often letting nature go its own way.

From the first flowers of spring to cardinals singing in the winter, Douglas shows us the magic of welcoming unexpected plant and animal life into one's backyard. A paean to the richness we find when we stop to look and let be, Nature on the Doorstep celebrates the role humble backyards play both in conservation efforts and in an expanded appreciation of the living world.

NATURE WRITINGS: Story of My Boyhood and Youth; My First Summer in the Sierra; Mountains of California; Stickeen

NATURE WRITINGS: Story of My Boyhood and Youth; My First Summer in the Sierra; Mountains of California; Stickeen

By: Muir, John
$35.00
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In a lifetime of exploration, writing, and passionate political activism, John Muir made himself America's most eloquent spokesman for the mystery and majesty of the wilderness. A crucial figure in the creation of our national parks system and a visionary prophet of environmental awareness, he was also a master of natural description who evoked with unique power and intimacy the untrammeled landscapes of the American West. Nature Writings collects his most significant and best-loved works in a single volume. The Story of My Boyhood and Youth (1913) is Muir's account of growing up by the sea in Scotland, of coming to America with his family at age eleven, and of his early fascination with the natural world. My First Summer in the Sierra (1911) is his famous account of the spiritual awakening he experienced when, 1869, he first encountered the mountains and valleys of central California. The Mountains of California (1894) draws on half a lifetime of exploration of the high Sierra country to celebrate and evoke the region's lakes, forests, flowers, and animals in a masterpiece of observation and poetic description. Also included are the widely popular "Stickeen" (1909), Muir's affectionate story of an adventure with a dog in Alaska, and a rich selection of essays - including "Yosemite Glaciers, " "God's First Temples, " "Snow-Storm on Mount Shasta, " "The American Forests, " and the late appeal "Save the Redwoods" - highlighting various aspects of his career: his exploration of what became Yosemite and Yellowstone national parks and the Grand Canyon, his successful crusades to preserve the wilderness, his early walking tour to Florida, and the Alaska journey of 1879.
NATURE'S PALETTE: SCIENCE OF PLANT COLOR

NATURE'S PALETTE: SCIENCE OF PLANT COLOR

By: Lee, David
$22.50
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Though he didn't realize it at the time, David Lee began this book twenty-five years ago as he was hiking in the mountains outside Kuala Lumpur. Surrounded by the wonders of the jungle, Lee found his attention drawn to one plant in particular, a species of fern whose electric blue leaves shimmered amidst the surrounding green. The evolutionary wonder of the fern's extravagant beauty filled Lee with awe--and set him on a career-long journey to understand everything about plant colors.

Nature's Palette
is the fully ripened fruit of that journey--a highly illustrated, immensely entertaining exploration of the science of plant color. Beginning with potent reminders of how deeply interwoven plant colors are with human life and culture--from the shifting hues that told early humans when fruits and vegetables were edible to the indigo dyes that signified royalty for later generations--Lee moves easily through details of pigments, the evolution of color perception, the nature of light, and dozens of other topics. Through a narrative peppered with anecdotes of a life spent pursuing botanical knowledge around the world, he reveals the profound ways that efforts to understand and exploit plant color have influenced every sphere of human life, from organic chemistry to Renaissance painting to the highly lucrative orchid trade.

Lavishly illustrated and packed with remarkable details sure to delight gardeners and naturalists alike, Nature's Palette will enchant anyone who's ever wondered about red roses and blue violets--or green thumbs.

NATURE, TECHNOLOGY, AND SOCIETY

NATURE, TECHNOLOGY, AND SOCIETY

By: Ferkiss, Victor
$30.00
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Traces cultural attitudes toward the environment and technology across the span of human civilization

While all human societies have enlisted technologies to control nature, the last hundred years have witnessed the technological exploitation and destruction of natural resources on an unprecedented scale. As environmental groups and the scientific community sound the alarm about deforestation, global warming, and ozone depletion, the obvious question arises: how did we get where we are today? In Nature, Technology, and Society, Victor Ferkiss sets out to answer this central question, arguing that we cannot escape from our present environmental predicament unless we understand the ideas which have created it.

Ferkiss asks the basic questions concerning humans and their relationship to the environment. He traces cultural attitudes towards the environment from early mankind to the present day. This fascinating book is distinctive both in its comprehensiveness, and in its attempt to place side by side influential thinkers and movements with varied views on these issues.

NEW COMPLETE MOUNTAIN BIKER

NEW COMPLETE MOUNTAIN BIKER

By: Coello, Dennis L
$18.95
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Fully updated, covering everything from selecting the right bike to back-country touring.
NIGHT COUNTRY

NIGHT COUNTRY

By: Eiseley, Loren
$19.95
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Toward the end of his life, Loren Eiseley reflected on the mystery of life, throwing light on those dark places traversed by himself and centuries of humankind. The Night Country is a gift of wisdom and beauty from the famed anthropologist. It describes his needy childhood in Nebraska, reveals his increasing sensitivity to the odd and ordinary in nature, and focuses on a career that turns him inward as he reaches outward for answers in old bones.
NO APPARENT DANGER

NO APPARENT DANGER

By: Bruce, Victoria
$13.95
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In 1985 in Columbia, more than 23,000 people died due to the government's failure to take seriously scientists' warnings about an imminent volcanic eruption at Nevado del Ruiz. In 1993, at Volcán Galeras, the death toll was smaller but no less tragic: despite seismic data that foretold possible disaster, an expedition of international scientists proceeded into the volcano. Two hours later, nine people were dead.Expertly detailing the turbulent history of Colombia, Victoria Bruce links together the stories of the heroes, villains, survivors, and victims of these two events. No Apparent Danger is a spellbinding account of clashing cultures and the life-and-death consequences of scientific arrogance.
NOBODY HOME: WRITING, BUDDHISM, AND LIVING IN PLACES

NOBODY HOME: WRITING, BUDDHISM, AND LIVING IN PLACES

By: Martin, Julia
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In this thoughtful, affectionate collection of interviews and letters spanning three decades, beloved poet Gary Snyder talks with South African writer and scholar Julia Martin. Over this period many things changed decisively--globally, locally, and in their personal lives--and these changing conditions provide the back story for a long conversation. It begins in the early 1980s as an intellectual exchange between an earnest graduate student and a generous distinguished writer, and becomes a long-distance friendship and an exploration of spiritual practice.

At the project's heart is Snyder's understanding of Buddhism. Again and again, the conversations return to an explication of the teachings. Snyder's characteristic approach is to articulate a direct experience of Buddhist practice rather than any kind of abstract philosophy. In the version he describes here, this practice finds expression not primarily as an Asian import or a monastic ideal, but in the specificities of a householder's life as lived creatively in a particular location at a particular moment in history. This means that whatever "topic" a dialogue explores, there is a sense that all of it is about practice--the spiritual-social practice of a contemporary poet.

OASIS THIS TIME: LIVING AND DYING WITH WATER IN THE WEST

OASIS THIS TIME: LIVING AND DYING WITH WATER IN THE WEST

By: Lawton, Rebecca
$18.95
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A 2019 Foreword INDIES Awards Finalist

"A powerful call for smarter water policy."
--THE OREGONIAN

Water, the most critical fluid on the planet, is seen as savior, benefactor, and Holy Grail in these fifteen essays on natural and faux oases. Fluvial geologist and former Colorado River guide Rebecca Lawton follows species both human and wild to their watery roots--in warming deserts, near rising Pacific tides, on endangered, tapped-out rivers, and in growing urban ecosystems.

Lawton thoroughly and eloquently explores human attitudes toward water in the West, from Twentynine Palms, California, to Sitka, Alaska. A lifelong immersion in all things water forms Lawton's deep thinking about living with this critical compound and sometimes dying in it, on it, with too much of it, or for lack of it. The Oasis This Time, the inaugural Waterston Desert Writing Prize winner, is a call for us to evolve toward a sustainable and even spiritual connection to water.

October, or Autumnal Tints

October, or Autumnal Tints

By: Thoreau, Henry David
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Originally delivered as a lecture shortly before the writer's own death, Henry David Thoreau's classic "Autumnal Tints" is an ode to autumn not as the season of death and decay, but of ripeness, fullness, and maturity. It is perhaps the best piece ever written on the subject of the fall color of the changing leaves. Thoreau hoped one day to turn it into an illustrated book called "October, or Autumnal Tints."

Thoreau's astute meditations are framed by a biographical essay by acclaimed scholar Robert D. Richardson that delves into the events and relationships influencing Thoreau's philosophy. Sensuous watercolors by Lincoln Perry bring to life the fall colors described so ecstatically by Thoreau, allowing longtime Thoreau fans and leaf-peepers alike to feel as though they are walking among the falling leaves alongside one of our best observers of the natural world.

OFF THE BEATEN PATH

By: Nature Conservancy
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The Nature Conservancy, long dedicated to the preservation of wild places, asked thirteen writers to visit one of its preserves or write from past outdoor experiences, allowing a place to trigger their imaginations and make a story possible. Several authors were inspired by the Landscapes of their youth (Jill McCorkle's North Carolina woods, or Richard Bausch's Blue Ridge Mountains), white others explored territory unfamiliar to them, such as Eric Lustbader, who trekked to Alaska.The contributors to Off the Beaten Path include many of our finest writers: Julia Alvarez, Rick Bass, Rita Mae Brown, Gretel Ehrlich, Barry Lopez, Howard Norman, and E. Annie Proulx. From the ominous to the humorous, from the tall tale to the meditative monologue, these stories reflect the variety and character of our diminishing wildlands and, in the end, lead us to places in ourselves that only the best fiction can reveal.
OLD WAYS: A Journey on Foot

OLD WAYS: A Journey on Foot

By: MacFarlane, Robert
$18.00
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The acclaimed author of The Wild Places and Underland examines the subtle ways we are shaped by the landscapes through which we move

Chosen by Slate as one of the 50 best nonfiction books of the past 25 years

In this exquisitely written book, which folds together natural history, cartography, geology, and literature, Robert Macfarlane sets off to follow the ancient routes that crisscross both the landscape of the British Isles and its waters and territories beyond. The result is an immersive, enthralling exploration of the voices that haunt old paths and the stories our tracks tell. Macfarlane's journeys take him from the chalk downs of England to the bird islands of the Scottish northwest, from Palestine to the sacred landscapes of Spain and the Himalayas. He matches strides with the footprints made by a man five thousand years ago near Liverpool, sails an open boat far out into the Atlantic at night, and commingles with walkers of many kinds, discovering that paths offer a means not just of traversing space but also of feeling, knowing, and thinking.

OMNIVORE'S DILEMMA

OMNIVORE'S DILEMMA

By: Pollan, Michael
$17.00
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"Outstanding . . . a wide-ranging invitation to think through the moral ramifications of our eating habits." --The New Yorker

One of the New York Times Book Review's Ten Best Books of the Year and Winner of the James Beard Award

Author of This is Your Mind on Plants, How to Change Your Mind and the #1 New York Times Bestseller In Defense of Food and Food Rules

What should we have for dinner? Ten years ago, Michael Pollan confronted us with this seemingly simple question and, with The Omnivore's Dilemma, his brilliant and eye-opening exploration of our food choices, demonstrated that how we answer it today may determine not only our health but our survival as a species. In the years since, Pollan's revolutionary examination has changed the way Americans think about food. Bringing wide attention to the little-known but vitally important dimensions of food and agriculture in America, Pollan launched a national conversation about what we eat and the profound consequences that even the simplest everyday food choices have on both ourselves and the natural world. Ten years later, The Omnivore's Dilemma continues to transform the way Americans think about the politics, perils, and pleasures of eating.

ON TOP OF AFRICA: THE CLIMBING OFKILIMANJARO AND MT. KENYA

By: Shulman, Neville
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The story of one man's experience of overcoming the hardship of climbing, with very little training or experience, using his Zen training. On Top of Africa offers much practical information for would-be mountain climbers and also offers us all inspired reading as we climb towards the summit of our own mountains, real or imaginary.
ONE-STRAW REVOLUTION

ONE-STRAW REVOLUTION

By: Fukuoka, Masanobu
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Call it "Zen and the Art of Farming" or a "Little Green Book," Masanobu Fukuoka's manifesto about farming, eating, and the limits of human knowledge presents a radical challenge to the global systems we rely on for our food. At the same time, it is a spiritual memoir of a man whose innovative system of cultivating the earth reflects a deep faith in the wholeness and balance of the natural world. As Wendell Berry writes in his preface, the book "is valuable to us because it is at once practical and philosophical. It is an inspiring, necessary book about agriculture because it is not just about agriculture."

Trained as a scientist, Fukuoka rejected both modern agribusiness and centuries of agricultural practice, deciding instead that the best forms of cultivation mirror nature's own laws. Over the next three decades he perfected his so-called "do-nothing" technique: commonsense, sustainable practices that all but eliminate the use of pesticides, fertilizer, tillage, and perhaps most significantly, wasteful effort.

Whether you're a guerrilla gardener or a kitchen gardener, dedicated to slow food or simply looking to live a healthier life, you will find something here--you may even be moved to start a revolution of your own.

ORACLE BONES: A Journey Through Time in China

ORACLE BONES: A Journey Through Time in China

By: Hessler, Peter
$15.99
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A century ago, outsiders saw China as a place where nothing ever changes. Today the country has become one of the most dynamic regions on earth. In Oracle Bones, Peter Hessler explores the human side of China's transformation, viewing modern-day China and its growing links to the Western world through the lives of a handful of ordinary people. In a narrative that gracefully moves between the ancient and the present, the East and the West, Hessler captures the soul of a country that is undergoing a momentous change before our eyes.

OUR NATIONAL PARKS

OUR NATIONAL PARKS

By: Muir, John
$16.99
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For every person who has experienced the beauty of the mountains and felt humbled by comparison.

John Muir's Our National Parks--reissued to encourage, and inspire travelers, campers, and contemporary naturalists--is as profound for readers today as it was in 1901.

Take in John Muir's detailed observations of the sights, scents, sounds, and textures of Yosemite, Yellowstone, and forest reservations of the West. Be reminded (as Muir sagely puts), "Wildness is a necessity; and that mountain parks and reservations are useful not only as fountains of timber and irrigating rivers, but as fountains of life."

John Muir's warmth, humor, and passionate advocacy for these public lands is enough to spur any reader on to plan a National Parks adventure of their own.