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Foreign Language Reference

READING LATIN

READING LATIN

Author: JONES, PETER V.
$45.00
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This course introduces Latin to students in the final years of high school, and especially in colleges and universities. It integrates the teaching of classical Latin with the history of the language and its crucial influence upon European languages and culture. A special feature is the attention paid to medieval Latin literature.
READING LATIN INDEPENDENT STUDY GU

READING LATIN INDEPENDENT STUDY GU

Author: JONES &
$34.99
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Reading Latin, written by Peter V. Jones and Keith C. Sidwell and published by Cambridge University Press in 1986, is a Latin course designed to help mature beginners read Latin fluently and intelligently. This Independent Study Guide is intended for students who are using the course on their own or with only limited access to a teacher. It contains notes on the Latin texts that appear in the Reading Latin Text volume, translations of all the texts, and answers to the exercises in the Grammar, Vocabulary and Exercises volume.
REMEMBERING TRADITIONAL HANZI 1: HOW NOT TO FORGET THE MEANING AND WRITING OF CHINESE CHARACTERS

REMEMBERING TRADITIONAL HANZI 1: HOW NOT TO FORGET THE MEANING AND WRITING OF CHINESE CHARACTERS

Author: HEISIG, JAMES W.
$31.00
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At long last the approach that has helped thousands of learners memorize Japanese kanji has been adapted to help students with Chinese characters. Book 1 of Remembering Traditional Hanzi covers the writing and meaning of the 1,000 most commonly used characters in the traditional Chinese writing system, plus another 500 that are best learned at an early stage. (Book 2 adds another 1,500 characters for a total of 3,000.)

Of critical importance to the approach found in these pages is the systematic arranging of characters in an order best suited to memorization. In the Chinese writing system, strokes and simple components are nested within relatively simple characters, which can, in turn, serve as parts of more complicated characters and so on. Taking advantage of this allows a logical ordering, making it possible for students to approach most new characters with prior knowledge that can greatly facilitate the learning process.

Guidance and detailed instructions are provided along the way. Students are taught to employ imaginative memory to associate each character's component parts, or primitive elements, with one another and with a key word that has been carefully selected to represent an important meaning of the character. This is accomplished through the creation of a story that engagingly ties the primitive elements and key word together. In this way, the collections of dots, strokes, and components that make up the characters are associated in memorable fashion, dramatically shortening the time required for learning and helping to prevent characters from slipping out of memory.

REMEMBERING TRADITIONAL HANZI 2: HOW NOT TO FORGET THE MEANING AND WRITING OF CHINESE CHARACTERS

REMEMBERING TRADITIONAL HANZI 2: HOW NOT TO FORGET THE MEANING AND WRITING OF CHINESE CHARACTERS

Author: HEISIG, JAMES W.
$29.00
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This book is the second of two volumes designed to help students learn the meaning and writing of the 3,000 most frequently used traditional Chinese characters. (A parallel set of volumes has been prepared for simplified characters.) The 1,500 characters introduced in Book 1 include the top 1,000 by frequency, plus another 500 best learned at an early stage. Book 2 adds the remaining 1,500 characters to complete the set.

The lessons of Book 2 have been arranged in such a way that they may be studied either after those of Book 1 or simultaneously with them. Students who wish to focus initially on the 1,000 most frequently used characters in the language can do so by studying Book 1 before moving on to Book 2. Many, if not most, learners will find this preferable. Students who wish to apply the logical ordering found in these pages to the entire list of 3,000 characters from the very beginning can take the more exacting, but also more rationally satisfying, approach of studying the parallel lessons of the two volumes together.

The lessons in this book are followed by two short, additional sections, one that introduces a number of "compounds," or characters that are best learned in pairs, and another that adds two "postscripts." The book also includes a number of comprehensive indexes that are designed to facilitate work with both volumes.
Of central importance to the approach found in these pages is the systematic arranging of characters in an order best suited to memory. In the Chinese writing system, strokes and simple components are nested within relatively simple characters. These characters, in turn, can serve as parts of more complicated characters, and so on. Taking advantage of this allows a logical ordering, making it possible for students to approach most new characters with prior knowledge that can greatly facilitate the learning process.

Guidance and detailed instructions are provided all along the way. Students are taught to employ "imaginative memory" to associate each character's component parts or "primitive elements" with one another and with a key word that has been carefully selected to represent an important meaning of the character. This is accomplished through creation of a "story" that engagingly ties the primitive elements and key word together. In this way, the collections of dots, strokes and components that make up the characters are associated in memorable ways, dramatically shortening the time required for learning and helping prevent characters from slipping out of memory.

RUSSIAN VOCABULARY CARDS

$14.95
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SANSKRIT GRAMMAR

SANSKRIT GRAMMAR

Author: WHITNEY
$29.95
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As Latin is key to the study of Western classics, so Sanskrit is the language of ancient Indian literature. This guide begins with an introduction to the Sanskrit alphabet, followed by a treatment of the accent - its changes in combination, inflection, and tone. Succeeding chapters discuss declension, conjugation, parts of speech, more.
SCHOLASTIC SANSKRIT

SCHOLASTIC SANSKRIT

Author: TUBB, GARY
$42.00
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This volume gives a complete introduction to the techniques and procedures of Sanskrit commentaries, including detailed information on the overall structure of running commentaries, the standard formulas of analysis of complex grammatical forms, and the most important elements of commentarial style. Since the majority of expository texts in Sanskrit are composed in the form of commentaries on earlier texts, this Manual will be of great use to many Sanskrit translators. Furthermore, because many philosophical and scientific texts are written in the style of formal debate using the same basic principles, the features covered in the manual are useful for reading all expository texts, whether they are commentaries or not.

Published by American Institute of Buddhist Studies (AIBS)

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SCRIBBLERS, SCULPTORS AND SCRIBES: COMPANION TO WHEELOCK'S LATIN AND OTHER INTRODUCTORY TEXTBOOKS

Author: LAFLEUR, RICHARD A.
$17.99
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Designed to accompany the Wheelock's curriculum.

From one of the country's leading Latinists, this all new reader is the perfect complement to any Latin program, and the first collection of entirely authentic, unadapted classical Latin texts that beginning students, from the very first day of their introduction to Latin, can read, enjoy, and profit from.

SECOND 100 CHINESE CHARACTERS

SECOND 100 CHINESE CHARACTERS

Author: MATTHEWS
$15.95
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This book is a quick and easy way to learn the second 100 basic Chinese characters.

All beginning Chinese language students struggle to memorize and learn to write Chinese characters. The Second 100 Chinese Characters adopts a structural approach which helps students to quickly master the basic characters that are fundamental to this language. Intended for use after The First 100 Characters, this book presents characters that have been carefully selected for rapid and effective learning.

The English meanings, pronunciations in Hanyu Pinyin and alternate forms (if any) for each Chinese character are presented along with a stroke order guide and spaces for writing practice. Printed with gray guidelines, the stroke order guides are designed to be traced over to teach students the standard sequence of strokes used to write the character. Related compounds and phrases are given to assist in vocabulary building. Three indexes at the back allow the characters to be looked-up by their English meanings, hanyu pinyin pronunciations, or radicals. Extra practice sheets of blank boxes are also provided for practice.

This book contains:

  • The second 100 most common Chinese characters.
  • Standard hanyu pinyin romanizations for each character
  • Compounds and phrases for vocabulary building.
  • Step-by-step stroke order diagrams show you how to write each character.
  • Special boxes with grid lines help you practice writing them correctly.
  • Compounds and sample sentences provide easy vocabulary building.
  • STUDENT'S DICTIONARY OF CLASSICAL AND MEDIEVAL CHINESE revised

    Author: KROLL, PAUL W.
    $49.95
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    Winner of the 2015 Choice Outstanding Academic Title Award
    Also available in hardback. The work is also included in the Chinese-English Dictionary Online.

    A Student's Dictionary of Classical and Medieval Chinese is the long-desired Chinese - English reference work for all those reading texts dating from the Warring States period through the Tang dynasty. Comprising 8,000+ characters, arranged alphabetically by Pinyin.
    As a lexicon meant for practical use, it immensely facilitates reading and translating historical, literary, and religious texts dating from approximately 500 BCE to 1000 CE. Being primarily a dictionary of individual characters (zidian 字典) and the words they represent, it also includes an abundance of alliterative and echoic binomes (lianmianci 連綿詞) as well as accurate identifications of hundreds of plants, animals, and assorted technical terms in various fields. It aims to become the English-language resource of choice for all those seeking assistance in reading texts dating from the Warring States period through the Tang dynasty.
    Previous Chinese-English dictionaries have persistently mixed together without clarification all eras and styles of Chinese. But written Chinese in its 3,000 year history has changed and evolved even more than English has in its mere millennium, with classical and medieval Chinese differing more from modern standard Chinese than the language of Beowulf or even that of Chaucer differs from modern English. This dictionary takes the user straight into the language of early and medieval texts, without the confusion of including meanings that developed only after 1000 CE. An added feature of the dictionary is its identification of meanings that were not developed and attached to individual graphs until the medieval period (approximately 250-1000 CE), setting these off where possible from earlier usages of the same graphs.
    Those who have, or are acquiring, a basic understanding of classical grammar, whether approaching the language from a background either in modern Chinese or Japanese, will find it eases their labors appreciably and helps to solve countless problems of interpretation. Advanced students will find it to be the one reference work they want always close at hand.
    The dictionary has an index by "radical" and stroke-number, and contains various appendices, including one with reign-eras and exact accession dates of emperors given according to both Chinese and Western calendars.
    Corrections have been provided by William Baxter for some of the Middle Chinese (MC) readings in this revised edition of the dictionary.